Humility/ Pride: Lesson Ideas

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If I am humble, the Lord can teach me.

Alma 32:1–13, 27–28 Alma 31:8–35

Ask the children what they remember learning last week about the Zoramites (see Alma 31:8–24). Remind them that one reason Alma was worried about them was their pride (see Alma 31:24–28).

Definition of Pride: A inflated, high opinion of one’s own importance, merit, or superiority.

The Zoramites were trying to elevate themselves above others and declare that they were better than everyone else.

In what ways might people think they are better than others and become lifted up in pride? Answers might include the following: people may think they are better than others because of how smart,  pretty or handsome, athletic, wealthy, or talented they are. (Have the children build with blocks or draw a part of the Rameumptom tower on the board as each answer is given.)

Ask the children how they would feel if they were being made fun of for not being as smart, good looking, athletic, talented, or rich as someone else.

Read together Alma 32:1–5, and ask the children to summarize what had happened to the Zoramites who were poor. Then invite the children to read verses 12–13 to find out why Alma felt that being cast out of their synagogues (or churches) was a good thing for these Zoramites. (Come, Follow Me—For Primary: Book of Mormon 2020 “Alma 32-35”)

What is humility? A modest opinion of one’s own importance, rank, etc.  Guide to the Scriptures: The condition of being meek and teachable. Humility includes recognizing our dependence upon God and desiring to submit to His will.

What are some of the blessings that come from being humble? Teachable, turn heart to the Lord, etc.

Display a hard, solid object (like a stone) to represent a hard or prideful heart and something soft (like soil) to represent a soft or humble heart. Let the children feel both objects. Then show the children a seed to represent the word of God. Invite them to try to push the seed into the hard object and the soft object. Read together Alma 32:27–28, and talk about what it might mean to “give place” (verse 27) for the word of God in our hearts. (Come, Follow Me—For Primary: Book of Mormon 2020 “Alma 32-35”)

How can we humble ourselves so we are not lifted up in pride? (Have the children take off or erase a level of the Rameumpton tower for every answer they give.) Answers may include the following: by remembering that our gifts, talents, and abilities come from the Lord, by praying for humility, by looking for the good in others, by building love for others by praying for them and serving  them.

The following video about pride and humility is from Latterdaykids.com.

When I am humble, Heavenly Father will bless me.

Helaman 1–6

Come, Follow Me—For Individuals and Families: Book of Mormon 2020 “Helaman 1–6: The Rock of Our Redeemer”

As you read Helaman 1–6—and throughout the Book of Mormon—you may notice a pattern in the behavior of the Nephites: When the Nephites are righteous, God blesses them and they prosper. After a time, they become prideful and wicked, making choices that lead to destruction and suffering. Then they are humbled and inspired to repent, and God blesses them once again. The pattern repeats itself so often that some people call it the “pride cycle.”

In Helaman 3, Mormon described a time when the Church was so prosperous and blessed that even the leaders were surprised (see verses 24–32). Eventually some people became prideful, while others grew “stronger and stronger in their humility, … even to the purifying and the sanctification of their hearts” (Helaman 3:35). Notice what the more humble people did to become sanctified. The Guide to the Scriptures (scriptures.ChurchofJesusChrist.org) defines sanctification as “the process of becoming free from sin, pure, clean, and holy through the Atonement of Jesus Christ.”

Come, Follow Me—For Primary: Book of Mormon 2020 “Helaman 1-6: The Rock of Our Redeemer”

  • Let the children help you draw on the board the following diagram of the “pride cycle.” Read together Helaman 3:24, 33–34 and 4:11–15, and invite the children to point to the parts of the cycle these verses describe.
  • Write the words Humble and Prideful on the board. Write a few examples of humble or prideful actions on slips of paper, and invite the children to take turns selecting a paper and putting it next to the word on the board that describes that action. What are some of the ways we can choose to be humble?

Book of Mormon Coloring Book “The Pride Cycle”

Puffed Up with Pride

Book of Mormon Teacher Resource Manual: 2 Nephi 25-30.  Bring some whole-grain wheat or rice to class along with some puffed wheat or rice. (This demonstration will also work with popcorn.) Show the puffed cereal to the class and ask what it is. Show the whole-grain cereal and ask: Which of these could you store the longest? Why? (The whole-grain cereal would store best because it is still protected by its hull.) Ask some or all of the following questions:

  • How is puffed grain made? (Grain is heated in a closed container until it is hotter than the temperature at which water turns to vapor. When the pressure is released, the water in the kernel turns to steam and explodes the kernel.)

  • Do we ever get into life situations that “put the heat (or pressure) on” and then, when circumstances change, we become “puffed up”?

  • What does it mean when people get “puffed up”? (They become conceited and snobbish. A person who is “puffed up” does not feel a need to rely on the Lord.)

  • Which has more food value: a bushel of whole grain or a bushel of puffed grain? Why? (With whole grain you get more food value. The puffed grain is mostly air.)

  • Which would you rather have: five “puffed up” friends or five sincere friends?

  • Which kind of friend would you rather be?

Ensign April 2020 “Weekly CFM Insights” Why Does King Benjamin Invite Us to Become like a Child?

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